Gerard Presencer | Product categories One Range
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One Range

Building from the basic idea that the trumpet is easiest to play in the middle register, this is atechnical approach that supports modern and often eclectic playing demands that we encounter.

We will develop our entire approach to feel as close to the middle register- keeping it together in the lower register and opening up more in the higher register.

This is a series of exercises to build on what you can already play to become more consistent and feel easy (even if it isn’t!).

Recorded examples will be released to accompany the written exercises.

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  • In this exercise we are trying to develop a light and constant airflow from legato into articulation. Look at the top center of your bell when playing-to reduce trumpet movement. For the comma'd breath marks, inhale a small amount of air through your nose-to ensure the embouchure remains in position with as little disruption as possible to the airflow. For larger breaths, stop the tempo completely to breath in slowly, then resume playing from the nearest fermata (pause). The crescendo can be really exaggerated to get the momentum and good pitch in your airflow. Play all 8th notes with an even feel. Do not try and swing, the articulation is the swing, but still try and play the articulation evenly. The most important aspect of this exercise is to emulate the sound of legato within articulation. Spend a week on each Stage and do not move on to the next stage until you play every key in a stage evenly and nearly all keys at the same tempo. One Range New exercise every month-for advanced players  
  • In this exercise we are trying to develop a light and constant airflow from legato into staccato. Look at the top center of your bell when playing-to reduce trumpet movement. For the comma'd breath marks, inhale a small amount of air through your nose-to ensure the embouchure remains in position with as little disruption as possible to the airflow. The crescendo can be really exaggerated to get the momentum into your airflow for the subsequent arpeggio. The dynamics of crescendo whether ascending or descending should sound and feel as similar as possible. This is unusual in descent (at first), but will ensure that you play faster air in descent -reducing facial movement and effort. This exercise is a continuation of One Range Exercise 1 One Range New exercise every month-for advanced players  
  • In this 12-tone pattern we are trying to develop breathing constant airflow through different dynamics, tempo and articulations. It's not an easy exercise and recommend that you look at the top centre of your bell when playing once you know the notes well enough to reduce trumpet movement. For 12/8 exercise you could also use DrumGenius (Afro-Cuban 6/8 no1.) for your 12/8 tempo. One Range New exercise every month-for advanced players  
  • In this exercise we use the traditional Arban template on the Lip-trill exercise. To say the term of 'lip trill' is actually incorrect for the physical approach¬†of this exercise is slightly contentious(!) but what is certain here is that the results of¬†working on this type of exercise are very positive. One Range New exercise every month-for advanced players  
  • First in a new series of practice routines designed to take you from the comfortable and open sounding middle register of the instrument- to develop the same approach in the lower and higher registers, thus creating One Range New exercise every month-for advanced players